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Woman stabbed as she fights back against dog-snatcher in UK park

Police confirmed a man had grabbed the dog’s lead from the woman. He then proceeded to press a sharp object into the woman’s arm, police said. The incident occurred at 2.45pm at Herringthorpe Playing Fields in Rotherham.

The woman managed to fight off her attacker who left empty-handed.

Police are now investigating the incident on Wickersley Road in Rotherham, according to the Sheffield Star.

A police statement said: “At around 2.45pm a woman was walking her dog at Herringthorpe Playing Fields, when she was approached by an unknown man.

“It is reported that the man grabbed the dog’s lead and pushed a sharp object into the woman’s arm, causing a small puncture wound.

“The victim fought back and the man fled the scene empty-handed.

“The victim suffered minor injuries to her arm and did not require hospital treatment.

“The man is described as possibly Asian or Eastern European, around 5ft 5 tall with black hair.

“He was wearing a mask, a thin, red jacket and black trousers.”

In the year ending March 2021, there were 41,000 offences involving a knife or sharp instrument in England and Wales, excluding the Greater Manchester area, according to Government figures.

Although this was 15 percent lower than in 2019/20, it was 27 percent higher than in 2010/11.

In 2019/20, there were 49,000 incidents involving a sharp instrument or knife.

That figure was the highest calendar year from 2010 to 2020/21.

Such is the knife crime epidemic hitting the country, volunteers are now being given military kits to help victims.

According to the Daily Mirror, St John’s Ambulance crews are now being supplied with Tourni-Keys.

This device can turn a strip of clothing into an improvised tourniquet.

Adam Williams, St John Ambulance’s head of community response said: “We are now using military-grade kit as some of the items we have introduced include blast dressings, which quickly stop blood loss and are used to help stabbing victims and also tourniquets, both of which originated and are commonly used on the battlefield.

“The changes to our equipment are very much a sign of the times.

“This is the changing face of first aid. It isn’t just about slips, trips and cut fingers anymore.

“Sadly, our ambulance crews and first aiders have had to deal with stabbing incidents as that’s what you get on a Friday or Saturday night in city centres nowadays.”

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